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2018

Mae Sot Trip

From 28/4/18 to 3/5/18, CRS sent a team of nine to Mae Sot, Thailand. The team is led by Dr Lim Koon Jin, and consists of Dr Jacqueline Tan, Dr Michael Warren Lim, Dr Margaret Teng, Yap El Fuon (Nurse), Yeo Sock Wan (Nurse), Selina Chan, Karen Wang and Phoebe Aw. The team partnered Paster Praphan from Steadfast Love Church (in Mae Tan) for the trip, and saw about 210 patients in total.

28 Apr 2018 (Day 1)

Departure from Singapore to Bangkok, followed by a flight to Mae Sot. At Mae Sot airport, the team met up with Pastor Praphan, and took a 2 hour car journey to Wongtawan Resort at Tha Song Yang, where the team would be staying at.

29 Apr 2018 (Day 2)

Started the day with devotion and left the resort for church at Pastor Praphan’s Steadfast Love Church. The Selina from Singapore shared her testimony, and Dr Koon Jin preached a sermon on the providence of God.

After church, the team travelled to Maw Poe Klo village of the Karens in the mountains to begin our first clinic session. The clinic was set up in the house of a church member, and the team ministered to about 49 patients, which was almost half the population of the village.

The clinic session ended in the late afternoon. The team travelled back to Mae Tan (a district in Tha Song Yang), where we had a home service at Teacher Victoria Tone’s house. Members from the team shared our testimonies with the local Karen and Thai people attending the service, and we prayed for church members and pre-believers.

30 Apr 2018 (Day 3)

The team conducted two clinic sessions today. We held a morning clinic session at Tha O Kee village, which was deep in the mountains. On the way to the village, we saw that many hills were scorched, as the locals practiced slash-and-burn before the planting season. The clinic was set up in the home of a family of believers, who hoped to bring more people in the village to Christ through the medical services. The team saw 26 patients here, and held a short worship session with the villagers.

Dr Jacqueline examining a patient

In the afternoon, the team moved to Ta Blu Yo village, where despite the heat, the villagers were very patient as they waited for their turn. The clinic saw about 30 patients. We are very grateful to the owners of the house who provided this space for the team to set up the clinic.

In the evening, the team returned to Pastor Praphan’s house for dinner. Pastor Praphan shared his story of how he procured the land for the church. The large parcel of land only costed 4500 Thai bhat – unknown to Pastor at that time, the land was known in the village as a cursed piece of land. No one in the village would want the land, even for free. The previous occupants of the land all met with some sort of misfortune, and even the children who went to the land to play would get into accidents. However, when Pastor Praphan purchased the land, he was told that three people in the village shared the same dream that spirits left the land, telling the villagers that someone else has came. After 20 years, with God’s blessings, no harm has fallen upon the land since Pastor Praphan bought the land for the church.

After dinner, the team went to Pastor Paul’s house for a home service with the local children and their families. The service was held in Burmese and Thai, and our team members shared testimonies on how Christ has shaped their lives.

1 May 2018 (Day 4)

In the morning, the team travelled to a church in Kra Ti, next to the Thai-Burmese border. Dr Koon Jin returned to Singapore this morning, and Dr Jacqueline led the team. The clinic in the church saw 34 patients, and with each patient, the team also had more time to minister for the patients. With the grace of God, 10 people were led to Christ during this session.

In the afternoon, the team travelled to Pastor Paul’s church to set up a clinic. However, it started drizzling, and we were worried that villagers would not come to the clinic. Nonetheless, the team saw 35 patients, and we had a busy session.

After the clinic, Pastor Paul brought us to visit the river marking the boundary between Thailand and Myanmar, and we swam across the river to the Burmese side. We also travelled to a parcel of land that was nearby, which has been purchased for Pastor Paul’s new church.

This marked the end of our clinic days, and in total, the team saw about 207 patients in total.

2 May 2018 (Day 5)

On the last day of our trip, the team was treated to rest and recreation. We visited the hot spring and waterfall in Mae Ka Sa, soaking in the nature and relaxing atmosphere. In the afternoon, the team took a look around the Border Market, which sells souvenirs and imports from Myanmar.

3 May 2018 (Day 6)

Returned from Mae Sot to Singapore, transiting in Bangkok.

During the trip, there were many sharing sessions between the team and our partners, and the team learnt about the good work that our partners have been doing. We are glad to have been able to minister to our partners, and to further extend God’s work in Thailand.

Comments

Phoebe: This is my second trip with CRS, and I realised how each trip can be so different and beautiful. I have many fond memories of the trip (especially the rides on the pick up truck!) and I will definitely miss the new friends I’ve made on this trip.

Karen: This was my first trip with CRS and it was really memorable: we travelled to the villages in the rural countryside to set up clinics and everything went extremely smoothly. I had many new experiences, all of which will not be found anywhere else.

Sock Wan: Mae Sot has never come to my mind as a part of Thailand. If not for CRS, I could not imagine that I will ever step into this piece of land and do medical services. The big smiles from the villagers have warmed my heart and made me want to give more besides the nursing knowledge I have. Looking at how the locals help each other across the villages and mountains is so touching. Some of them have to walk miles and miles to cross the jungle to reach a town and make a living, and this is not an easy task. Even though with such living conditions, they still do not give up. Living in poverty is not their choice. But choosing to live with happiness definitely is. On top of that, God is always with us! Amazing grace!

 

 

Serving The Orang Asli Community

On the 10th of June’18, a team of 9 volunteers from Crisis Relief Singapore (CRS) led by Vincent Tan embarked on a first time 1 day Medical Mission trip to the Orang Asli Community of Sungei Temon, JB Malaysia.

orang-asli

With our partner Rhema City Church (RCC) led by Pastor Jonathan and Pastor Marry, we were there to provide Health check, Hypertension and Diabetes Awareness workshop, Oral Hygiene Education to the children and gave out free vitamins for the villages here.

We moved out from Singapore at about 6 am by a 10 seaters MPV that we engaged from Malaysia which will drive us anywhere we want in JB for the whole day and back to Singapore. Once we were in JB, we went for our morning breakfast of kaya & butter toast, nasi lemak and kopi. After our breakfast we adjourned to the Orang Asli village for our medical work. The villages were so welcoming when they saw us. In total we saw 69 villages came for the health check-up inclusive of taking weight, height, blood sugar test, BP check and follow by health and hygiene awareness talk. We ended the medical work at noon and was blessed with sumptuous and delicious seafood lunch by RCC.

During the afternoon, we went for window shopping and some went for massage at Paradigm Mall, in the late afternoon we met up for a very fruitful fellowship among the volunteers.

At about 530pm, we adjourned to RCC for service which will start at 8pm. Before service we were again blessed by RCC for a delicious home cook dinner ie Wild Boar Bat Kut Teh (by Pastor Marry), Salted chilli crabs (crabs killed by Tetty) and some other dishes.

During service I felt the presence of God was so tangible as the church members were praising and worshipping God, I can see that they were so hungry for the touch of God in their individual life.

June shared a wonderful testimony, KJ shared an awesome word that God put in his heart and Chooi Peck shared offering message in Malay.

On the whole, every volunteers in the team agreed that though was just a 1 day trip, it was a fruitful and meaningful trip especially for the Malaysian.

Team Member and Role

  1. Vincent – Team IC                     8. Jeannie    – Nurse / TransportationTetty            2.   Tetty            – Team 2IC / Photography              9. David – Photographer & videographer.
  2. Koon Jin – Doctor / Medical logistic
  3. June – Logistic
  4. Chooi Peck – Health Educator / Nurse
  5. Ivy – Pharmacy / Nurse
  6. Sharon – Pharmacy

 

 

Philippine Mission Trip

CRS has been working with Pastor Emil for the past 2 years. This year CRS is back here to serve again.

Date: 11-15th May 2018

11 team members include 3 doctors, 1 nurse.

11th May 2018, Friday(Day 1)

Departure from Singapore at 2.05pm to Clark, then we took minivan to Bulacan. Reached hotel (Hollywood suite & resort) at 10.45pm.

12th May 2018, Saturday(Day 2)

Location of mobile clinic: Life of the world church, Meycauyan

We had devotion at 7am n left the hotel at appx 8.10am. When we reached the church, the queue has alr started n many boys were waiting for the circumcision. I wonder those young boys know what’s ahead them!

13th May 2018, Sunday(Day 3)

Location of the mobile clinic: Life of Church, Caloocan

We had our breakfast at Jollebee, their famous fast food in Philippines. But Vincent is not a fan of it, yet he still came with us because few of us have yet to try it. After breakfast we took 30 mins journey to Pastor Rey’s church. We had morning church service & mobile clinic in the afternoon.

Total of patients: 101   Salvation: 7   Rededication: 1

14th May 2018, Monday (Day 4)

It was Election Day, so pastor decided to arrange a R&R day for us! We left the hotel at 5am n took 3 hours journey to Panguil River Eco Park. We stopped by at a small town called Tanay for breakfast.

15th May 2018, Tuesday (Day 5)

Location for children ministry: Light of the World Christian Center, Bulacan

Our last day of mission trip! We had devotion at 6.30am, led by Julie & Jaclyn. Jaclyn shared that when we obey what God tells us to do, God is working with us. We do not need to know how, but we know who is with us.

God’s grace at work. Many of us have stepped out of comfort zone to work n have fun as a team. It ended well n back home safely.

Here are the comments from some of our team members;

Sharon was encouraged by how the pastor n his team work together in different churches. He even brought his team to the R&R outing with us as a bonding activity. She believes that when a team has a strong bond in relationship and in unity, they are able to do much more work for the kingdom of God.

Julie’s goal for this mission trip is learn to be adaptable as she has always felt so tight in doing things. But thru out the whole trip God shows her that she can be adaptable yet joyful. It was a fun trip for her!

Cecelia, our team leader. She was so thankful that the team is able to rise up n step out of comfort zone for His work. She finds it really nice for the worship sessions with the locals that we are able to gel in well together with them to worship God. She felt that Holy Spirit is among everybody.

Space for improvement;

– get deworming syrup or chewing medicine for the younger children, they do not know how to swallow the med yet.

– get a tag for each member especially on the day where we are not wearing CRS shirt. So the patients or church members will recognize who’s from the CRS team.

– Figure out how to control the crowd during children ministry.

2017
9th to 13th  Sept ’17 Our CRS Medical Mission Team to Manila in Philippines .

Medical clinic run by Dr. Lim KJ
Team Members : June Lim, Florence Lim, Jaclynn Quah, Tan Chooi Peck, Tetty Teh & Vincent Tan.
Total of 377 patients seen in 2 days . 1st day 237patients , 2 nd day 140 patients )

9 Sept Day 1 -At Light of the World Christian Centre in Meycauayan 80% people not from church most people turn up by word of mouth. Total of 237 patients two thirds are young children.
Salvation – Child seen by Dr. Lim & Pastor Emil prayed for the child seizure stopped. After that Mother received salvation .

10 Sept Day 2- Sunday service in The Light of the World Church in Bulakan Bulacan. Dr. Lim KJ gave sermon ‘Journey of Faith’.
Followed by medical consultation by Dr. Lim KJ. Total of 140 patients seen.
Salvation – One family across the church first time opened up their house to receive us.

11 Sept Day 3 – Ministering at The Great Living God Church in Tuy ,Batangas.
Children Ministry est. no. 60 children. We have games, bible story telling & feeding program.
Followed with women & men’s Cellgroup encouraging women & men to be useful & give glory to Our Heavenly Father.

13 Sept Day 4- Pastor Emil drove us to visit Manila North Cemetry. Spoke to a lady she has been staying in the cemetry since birth. Interviewed she told us that there are about 1000 families total around 5000 residents staying in cemetry. Estimated children by pastor in this area 300 children. Pastor Emil took phone no of the lady in charge of the cemetry for further correspondence. Pastor Emil also suggested we could have medical clinic at this cemetry .

We are happy that we are able to sow our seeds so many young children & youth touched by Spirit of God in Manila.
Is a meaningful trip we have medical & ministry work together.

 

CRS Penang  Medical Mission Trip

Spanning over 12th to 15th August 2017, the medical mission trip initiated by Crisis Relief Singapore (CRS) sent a team of 8 to Penang, led by team leader Jaclyn and Dr Lim Koon Jin. This trip involved 2 medical doctors, 1 nurse and 6 volunteers. Within the relatively small group of volunteers, half of the team were embarking on their very first cold trip with CRS.

On one of the four days, volunteers had the opportunity to be involved in the local church service at Audacity Church Penang and listen to sermons and sharing by the locals.

Each morning started off with a round of devotions and prayers, and ended with a debriefing session where volunteers got to share their ups and downs with the rest of the team, learning from each other’s experiences. This year, CRS collaborated with Audacity Church Penang, led by Pastor Saras and Pastor Felina. Volunteers conducted the Children Ministry where students got to take part in games while learning about simple science concepts. The medical clinic ran simultaneously and saw a total of 162 students and teachers. Throughout the day, volunteers rotated around different stations such as manning of the triage booth, dispensary section and holding an educational corner where students were taught simple hand-washing techniques while medical doctors Dr Lim Koon Jin and Dr Linda Khioe tended to the needs of the students and teachers.

Volunteer Joycelyn Soo commented, “This is my first trip with CRS and despite it being a relatively short one, I feel very privileged to be able to serve a community overseas, together with my team members. I am very thankful that I got to participate in the medical clinic such as at the dispensary and despite the language barrier, be able to play a part in teaching the students simple hand-washing techniques, which I believe goes a long way in disease prevention. This trip was a very humbling experience as it served as a reminder that people living overseas may not readily have access to healthcare services as we do here in Singapore. It motivates me to want to do more for these overseas communities and what I can do now is to embark on more of these medical mission trips and reach out to more people.”

Despite the small number of volunteers participating in this trip, it was in God’s grace that the trip proceeded smoothly and the team managed to attend to all the students and teachers who they came across. The team concluded the trip with a high note and volunteers left with fuller hearts ready to serve.

 

 

CRS Mongolia Trip 2017

From 07/12/17 to 13/12/17, CRS sent a team of nine to Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. The team is led by Dr Lim Koon Jin, and consists of June Chan, Ivy Chen, Cecilia Chow, Melia Tong, Ellia Tong, Vincent Tan, Guo Lei and Phoebe Aw. The team partnered Dr Park Kwan Tae for the trip, and saw about 150 patients in total.

7 Dec 2017 (Day 1)

Departure from Singapore to Beijing, followed by a flight to Ulaanbaatar.

After arriving at Chinggis Khan International Airport, the team travelled to Agape Christian Hospital and guesthouse, which was a short drive from the airport. The hospital provides services such as X-Ray and endoscopy, and prides itself on the dialysis ward, which is the best in Mongolia. The dialysis centre in the hospital provides free services, and beds are equipped with personal monitors for the patients. The hospital also has a hospice, which is named after the memory of Prof. Park’s best friend, who passed away from cancer at a young age. The hospital has an in-house pastor and evangelist too. Outside the hospital, the compound has a small ger cafe offering affordable drinks, and is the only ger cafe in Mongolia. While sipping a drink in the cafe, Dr Park shared that with God’s provision, he was able to set up his hospital with impressive equipment, and donations would come by when he most needed them.

The team had dinner at a Chinese restaurant, and visited the Zaisan Tolgoi Observatory where we saw a beautiful night view of Ulaanbaatar, albeit shrouded in a visible layer of smog.

8 Dec 2017 (Day 2)

Started the day with devotion at 6.30a.m., and left the guesthouse at 7.30a.m. for the mobile clinic in Belkh, which is the poorest part of Ulaanbaatar. The clinic was set up in a church, and offered free services to church members and residents in the neighborhood. In addition to general consultation, there were also dental, surgical, and obstetrics and gynecology services provided. Dr Koon Jin remarked that many patients displayed stress symptoms, and thyroid problems were common. The GP clinic saw 67 patients.

9 Dec 2017 (Day 3)

Started clinic from 9.00a.m. at Agape Christian Hospital. Dr Koon Jin set up his clinic providing general consultation. The GP clinic itself saw 45 patients.  There were also separate rooms for other medical services, such as dental, surgery, X-ray and ultrasound. After the days work, the team went to a ski resort for night skiing.

10 Dec 2017 (Day 4)

Church service at Agape in the morning, at the request of the host, the team sang What A Beautiful Name. Spent the afternoon and evening at Prof Park’s house, where he holds weekly church services for the Mongolian doctors.

Note: The videos for the team’s worship session at the church can be found at goo.gl/rYsLNF

11 Dec 2017 (Day 5)

Clinic service at Agape Christian Hospital, as with Day 3. The GP clinic saw about 40 patients, and the dentist saw 25. Spent the evening at Prof Park’s house where he shared about his journey and experiences as a missionary.

12 Dec 2017 (Day 6)

Horse-riding and dog sleigh in Terelji National Park. The dog sleigh experience was a first for all volunteers, and part of the ride was on a frozen river. The rides showed us the glory of God’s creations in nature, with a beautiful snowy, mountainous landscape and lively animals.

During the trip, there were many sharing sessions between the team and our partners, and the team learnt about the good work that our partners have been doing. We are glad to have been able to minister to our partners, and to further extend God’s work in Mongolia.

13 Dec 2017 (Day 7)

Comments

Phoebe: This was my first mission trip with CRS, and I am very grateful for the experiences, the people, and for God’s watchfulness and blessings. Hearing the experiences from our local partners, it truly showed how God always provides for us, and I am very thankful for the warm hospitality from the hosts and friendships that were formed.

Ivy: It’s my first time to Mongolia for Mission trip. Thank God for the local partner: Prof Park who so graciously accommodated and worked alongside us in meeting our physical needs and providing translations during the clinics and our ministry.

It was eye opening to see God’s ministry in Mongolia and I will continue to pray for Prof Park and his family in Mongolia.

I’m thankful to have a team that is so independent and able to work with our partner so well. :)

Indeed God is Good.

Guo Lei: It’s my first time on a mission trip, and the experience was thoroughly enjoyable. I am blessed to have experienced such an amazing trip, and to have seen God’s work in Mongolia. Looking forward to more trips with CRS in the future!

Melia: The trip was a new and different experience for me, where I worked in a hospital and survived in a cold environment.

Ellia: It was fun to be able to help people recover.

 

Laos Journal Report

15th Nov – 20th Nov 2017

Psalm 9:1 “I will give thanks to you, Lord, with all my heart; I will tell of all your wonderful deeds “

1 team. 10 Females. 6 days. 367 Patients.

15th to 20th Nov 2017 Our CRS Medical Mission Team to Laos (Phonxay Health Centre)

Medical clinic run by Dr Jennifer Yeo
Team Members: Ivy Chen, Cecilia Chow, Jennifer Loh, Zealyn Toong, Jaime Goh, Patricia Chow, Catherine Ong, Melia Tong, Ellia Tong

Total of 367 patients seen in 3 days.

1st day (Half Day Clinic): 80 patients; 2nd Day (Full Day Clinic): 202 patients; 3rd Day (Half Day Clinic): 85 patients

15 Nov (Day 1)
Departure from Singapore to Bangkok followed by flight to Luang Prabang. Travelled by bus for 4 hours to Friendship Hotel at Oudomxay. Team was received by the local team –  Mina, Kristine and Rovei. Mina and Kristine are from Korea while Rovei is from India.

16 Nov (Day 2)

Met Dr Indara Phetsamone (Eye Surgeon and Local Doctor Contact) and team set off on a 3.5hour ride to Phonxay Health Centre. Upon arrival, team set up the clinic and started receiving patients from 12.30pm. Total number of patients: 80. There were activities for the children who came by and team gave out snacks, notebooks and toothbrushes/paste. Team was hosted by the villagers for our one-night homestay.

17 Nov (Day 3)
Full day clinic, a total of 202 patients. Many patients started streaming into Phonxay Health Centre from early morning, more efforts were required for crowd control. There was a large crowd of children who dropped by the health centre to play from morning to afternoon. Team gave out snacks to the children. Before departing from Phonxay Health Centre for Souvanhmy Xokxay Hotel, children were seen picking up team’s thrown bottles and drinking from the leftover liquids in the bottles. It was a heart-breaking sight.

18 Nov (Day 4)

Half day Clinic: 85 patients. One of the patients came in with chest pains and was advised to rest for a while. Thank God she felt better after drinking some milk and Dr Jennifer was able to conduct the health check-up and give the prescription. Team had actually closed the clinic for the afternoon and was preparing to set off from Phonxay Health Centre to Oudomxay. Then came three young villagers who walked from early morning (about 5 hours) from their village to come to Phonxay Health Centre for a check-up. Dr Jennifer saw the patients and medicine was provided for them. Team did an appreciation of team members over dinner. Team felt blessed working together and agreed there was great camaraderie even though some of us only met once before the trip. The local team (Mina, Kristine and Rovei) shared similar thoughts about the trip and have been truly blessed.

19 Nov (Day 5)
Dr Indara Phetsamone gave out handmade scarfs to the team before our departure.  Team visited Friendship Secondary School in Oudomxay (where the local partners worked). Mina was the Principal, Kristine was the Vice-Principal and Rohei just started four months ago as an English Teacher.  There were 8 teachers and 5 admin staff. The school was well-equipped with classrooms, staff room, canteen, café, library. Our local partners requested for more books if team was able to provide. Team prayed for God’s providence and protection over the school and teachers. We felt God’s presence as we lifted Friendship Secondary School into His Hands. Team give out appreciation and love gifts to Mina, Kristine and Rohei and thank them for their support throughout the whole journey – from planning to the trip itself. We bidded farewell to our local partners and set off on our 4-hour journey back to Luang Prabang for R&R.

20 Nov (Day 6)
Travelled from Luang Prabang to Singapore, with a transit in Kuala Lumpur. Despite delays in our flights, we thank God for team’s safe arrival in Singapore.

We are glad that we are able to encourage the local team as well as bless the villagers in Huon Village. It is the villagers’ first encounter with foreigners (in the context of Medical Relief). As Laos is a communist country, we were not allowed to openly speak about Christianity/God or pray publicly. Though the team faced many uncertainties before and during the trip, we are grateful to our Almighty God for watching over us (especially since we are an all-female team and it is the first trip to Laos).

Comment from a 1st time tripper with CRS, Ms Patricia Chow:

“Glad to be part of CRS team to be able to bring medical aid to remote villagers (some came on foot & walked for 5 hrs to reach us; some came from their fields in a tractor). Sad that we can’t do more for some but we do what we can.  We have rotating duties each day so it was a good experience.

Eye opening trip for me as a city gal, and definitely a reminder not to take things back home in SG for granted – like water, electricity, ease of transport, freedom to practice our faith.

Grateful for non-rainy weather, superb team work & camaraderie (we only met twice before the trip & don’t know everyone), bowed over by the amazing dedication of our Korean partners in Laos.  Youngest in the team were 12 & 13 years old.  So yes, you & your family can join us next time.  More doctors & nurses needed too! Kudos to CRS staff & volunteers for your love, your time & your smiles!”

Comment from a 1st time tripper with CRS, Ms Catherine:

“This is my maiden trip with CRS. I came to know about CRS through Cecilia.

Thanksgiving points:
– Camaraderie spirit between the team members. It’s amazing that the team could work so well despite only having met each other 2 times prior to the trip. All Glory to His Name!
– Thank God for the local partners ; Mina , Christine and Rovei who so graciously accommodate and work alongside us in meeting our physical needs, translation work during the clinics and our ministry.
– seeing the living condition of the Laos reminds me to be thankful for what we  take for granted here in Singapore.

I will continue to pray for Laos.  From the trip, i notice that Laos is a relatively young country with huge potential.  They have many young children and the country is

currently going through infrastructure transformation – we passed through one of the hydroelectric project along Nam Ou River near Luang Prabang.  I pray for education opportunity, basic amenities (clean water, electricity and transport) and basic healthcare knowledge for the Laos people.

Most importantly, they will come to know the love of God for them. All Glory to God!”

2016
The team with our local partners from City on a Hill Church
Team dinnner at fire and ice pizzeria on the last nightTeam at changi airportRuins of a building destroyed by the earthquakePraying for healing upon the sick and      elderlyLong queue of Nepali waiting to see the doctorEntertaining the Nepali childrenEnjoying Nepalese FoodEmergency helpDr Mok and Dr Ankit seeing patientsNurse Ivy dressing woundsThe team making the long journey to the village in the cold foggy morning
Crisis Relief Singapore Mission Trip to Gorhka, Nepal.

From the 1st to the 7th of December 2016, Crisis Relief Singapore (CRS) sent a team of volunteers to the Gorkha region of Nepal to run medical clinics in the rural villages. It was a follow up mission to previous CRS trips to provide aid to those devastated by the earthquake in 2015. The 16 man strong team was led by team leader Terence Lim and co-led by Vincent Tan. With volunteers as young as 11 years old, this was one of the largest and most diverse teams that CRS has ever sent. Half the team also comprised of volunteers working with CRS for the first time. During our trip we were blessed to be able to liaise with some of the locals who not only provided us with shelter on the mountains, transport and food, but also helped out as translators. We were also extremely fortunate to have a local doctor, Dr Ankit working alongside our own team doctor, Dr Paul Mok during the medical clinics, where his vast local experienced proved to be invaluable.

The days would start with a session of morning devotions and worship before we ate breakfast and proceeded with the activities for that day, whether it be travelling or the running of medical clinics. Without fail we would end the day with a team debrief to provide closure and set the expectations for the next day. The team ran 3 clinics on the 3rd, 4th and 5th of December, each time at a different location. The first clinic was run at the local church where we had set up base camp, the second at a community centre in Deurali village and finally the third at a small village down the mountain. Patients would go through registration and triage before they managed to see the doctor and finally receive their prescribed medicine from the pharmacy. The second and third clinics required the team to trek a considerable distance up and down the mountains to get from the local church to the different villages. We saw over 400 patients over the 3 days and the joy in the villager’s faces when they saw the doctors was immeasurable.

On the first day the team also participated in their local church service, with a vast majority of the team being Christians. Dr Mok shared the sermon for that day and volunteer Xiang Cen shared her testimony, of course both were aided by the translator. Seeing the Nepalese worship so fervently and losing themselves in the presence of God was truly an amazing experience for the team members.

Volunteer Sheryl commented:

“I’m really grateful for the opportunity to go to Nepal ad God has truly seen our team through from the start. We worked really well together; everyone took initiative and played a role in the smooth running of the medical camp. Seeing the desperation in the villagers was heart breaking, but hopefully we could provide some comfort through our medical services, or even just holding a hand and giving a smile. It was a joy to witness God’s creation.”

Finally, despite the large number of volunteers, which undoubtedly put a strain on the limited number of translators, everyone managed to find a role and contribute their 100%. The initiative and energy shown by each volunteer was unparalleled and the team worked together like a well-oiled machine despite sparse interactions with each other prior to meeting at Changi airport on the first day. I truly thank God for this chance to go to Nepal.

The team with our local partners from City on a Hill Church
Townsfolk from Lembang waiting to be seen outside our mobile clinicThe team with our local partners from City on a Hill ChurchThe stream of patients seemed relentless at times.The Singapore Team comprised students, nurses, and doctors from Duke-NUS and CRSTeaching the teenagers and teaches basic first aid skillsTaking histories and performing examinations to manage each patientSharing the importance of Personal Hygiene to the Orphanage childrenOur heros-our translators, always ready to help and offer assistance at all stations in the clinic

Bandung, Indonesia. 10th – 15th April 2016

Project Dove, the Duke-NUS Overseas Volunteering Expedition, organized annually by Duke-NUS medical students, aims to improve health efforts in the surrounding regions. This year, our team of 20 Medical students and four doctors from Duke-NUS Medical School was privileged to work with Dr. KJ Lim and three nurses from Crisis Relief Singapore. We conducted a 3-day mobile clinic and health education program for the underserved in the town of Lembang, located in the province of West Bandung, Indonesia. The students, a mix of first and third years, started planning, fundraising, and preparing for this trip since October last year and highly anticipated the week of 10th-15th of April. We were fortunate to have our local partners from City on a Hill Church, who not only provided translation assistance, but also took care of our transport, meals, and welfare. Our efforts were joined by faculty and medical students from the University Padjadjaran Medical School in Bandung, who kindly took the time in seeing patients with us.

 

Before 7am each morning, Dr. Lim held optional morning devotions. After breakfast, we would start preparing for each day of clinic held at three different community centers. Seeing the patients queue up was unquestionably intimidating. For 3 days, we manned triage, addressed their chief complaint, conducted physical examinations, presented our cases to the doctors in charge. As much as we could, we dispensed free medication to the townsfolk, who could not otherwise afford them, and counseled them on good health practices. The patients presented with a variety of complaints, from musculoskeletal problems to fever and cough to generalized itchiness. Our clinic was open till the last patient, who travelled to us, was seen. In total, we saw more than 600 patients over the 3 days. None of this would have been possible if not for the translators who worked tirelessly while patiently relaying our questions and instructions to the patients. On top of that, they also ensured that each patient left with some food and water. Never one to leave patients unseen, a small group led by Dr. Lim then made house calls in the evenings for patients who were unable to come.

 

On our final work day in Lembang, we held a health education program for the “House of New Hope” orphanage and teachers from the Eagle School.  The younger children rotated through various stations, which included de-licing, dental health education, and hand hygiene education. Meanwhile, the teenagers and teachers attended a sex education class and basic first aid workshop. Though we were honored to provide medical interventions to the patients who presented at our clinic in the days before, we strongly believe that the health education program gave us an added opportunity to inspire the students and teachers to make a sustainable change to their healthcare and lifestyle. With the funds raised, the team also left groceries and necessities for the orphanage’s use.

 

Joanne Ting, a first year on the trip commented,

Project Dove taught me many things, including how to appreciate different cultures, and to have a deeper understanding on the various healthcare challenges in different regions. I learnt after, there is no direct parallel in Indonesian for the words we use to describe pain in English. It was made clear through seeing the many patients with chronic hypertension that giving diagnoses and medication sometimes were simply not enough to “cure” their problems, and that their health status is often closely linked with their socio-economic status and their mental and emotional health.

Her classmate, Vanessa Lim, added,

We also learnt about humility through service, as we realize how much we do not know, how much more there is to learn, how much more we can improve ourselves to be. Most importantly through this trip, I’ve learnt that it is the warmth and human connection that has sustained us in our common goal to make a positive impact, no matter how big or small it might be.

 

This opportunity to travel and practice medicine in Lembang has been an honor to every member of the team, and it would not have been possible without the help of our sponsors and all our supporters. We returned from Lembang having developed a greater understanding of medicine and ourselves. We learnt to express empathy through our actions even if we may not speak the same language and to go the extra mile for our patients and each other.

Reported By Ms. Alicia Ong

2015
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CRS Myanmar Trip 2015

207 patients treated, 5 orphanages visited, 246 children impacted and $1680 donated on top of medical aid provided.  This 5-day trip to Yangon, Myanmar from 19 to 23 March 2015 had been truly fruitful and heartwarming.  Formed by 1 doctor, 2 senior nurses, 3 first-timers, and 1 zealous volunteer, this motley team of 7 was led by Jadon Wong from Crisis Relief Singapore with a sole vision to bless the people of Yangon and to serve them with verve.

 

Centering Jesus at the heart of this trip, each day started with worship and devotion, followed by the gobbling down of breakfast before travelling out to various churches, orphanages and village to set up and run the mobile clinic, while the children ministry ran in tandem. Besides the doctor and nurses who held their respective specialized roles, the rest of the team members had their hands in completing the triage, dispensing medicine, praying for the sick and for salvation and conducting various activities with the children such as dancing, looming, origami and handing out delightful pieces of balloon sculptures. Everyone had a role to play and the ability to bless the locals they met.

 

The pace of this routine although tiring, was not the greatest challenge the team experienced. Yangon’s summer heat of 40-degrees was sapping. In fact one of the things the team was thankful for was the occasional breeze that refreshed the otherwise hot afternoons that were heavy with languor.  Besides talk about the weather, one of the most memorable incidents that occurred during this trip was celebrating the birth of Pastor Abraham’s grandson. It was a privilege to be able to welcome this baby with Pastor and his family, yet it was also a humbling experience for the team as they went to the local hospital to visit the mother and infant. The difference between the local and Singapore’s hospital was stark. Situated in a dilapidated building, medical facilities were bare, patient’s privacy was non-existent and hygiene was dubious, which are all likely linked to the reason why there is a high infant mortality rate in this country. The ravages of poverty were evident and hard to obliterate. It was a heart-breaking sight to see how locals managed with what they have in their hands. There was nothing luxuriating, only survival.

 

Common sicknesses such as malnutrition, scabies, chicken pox, worms in stomach, and muscle stiffness were given immediate care and treated with medication. However some patients approached the clinic with cancer and tuberculosis in their body, hence the team prayed and believed with them that God will heal and move in signs and wonders. A note taken for future trips was the increasing need for prescriptive glasses as the lack of good lighting have caused many to suffer from myopia. Dental care is also required especially amongst the younger age group as several came with severe tooth decays.

 

The works that can be done for Yangon can never be quite enough, but likening to the story of the starfish, where only one starfish could be thrown back into the sea at one time, at least to that one starfish, a difference has been made. The ripple effect made through this trip in Yangon might not be known now, but is definite, not only to the community there, but also in each tripper’s life as the altruistic spirit displayed by those who love the orphans beyond flesh and blood was truly inspirational.

 

 

Numbers at a glance:

 

How the S$1680 donation was spent

  • 400 kg of rice
  • 330 pencil cases/files filled with pen, pencil, sharpener, eraser, ruler, coloring pencil, coloring book and notebook
  • 117 pair of slippers
  • 40 umbrellas
  • 27 school bags
  • Milo, Oat drink and snacks
  • Subsidized medical treatment for patients in need

 

Itinerary and distribution of donated items

Day 1:

New Heritage Orphanage (Leader: Pastor James)

Treated 4 patients

Donated:

  • 14 pairs of slippers
  • 14 umbrellas
  • 14 pencil cases filled with stationeries
  • Pre-loved clothes

 

Life Garden (Leader: Pastor Paul)

Treated 12 patients

Donated:

  • 26 umbrellas
  • 26 pencil cases filled with stationeries
  • 7 school bags for students with best results
  • Pre-loved clothes

Funding requests:

  • Eye check-up required by Pastor Paul’s wife
  • ECG required for murmur in heartbeat for orphanage worker

 

Day 2:

Galilee Village (Leader: Pastor Abraham)

Treated 98 patients

Donated:

  • 400kg of rice to the villagers
  • 69 pairs of slippers
  • 150 plastic files filled with stationeries
  • Pre-loved clothes
  • Subsidized consultation fees for colorectal specialist
  • Subsidized blood test
  • Subsidized eye check-up

Prayer requests:

  • Upgrading of chapel
  • Start of discipleship program in the church

 

Tender Love Home (Leader: Rev Dr. Mung)

Treated 41 patients

Donated:

  • 50 plastic files filled with stationeries
  • Subsidized 7 eye check-ups
  • Subsidized 1 urine test
  • Subsidized 1 blood test
  • Subsidized 2 dental treatments

Prayer requests:

  • A car for the orphanage to use as a ‘gospel car’
  • To have a good preschool educator
  • To build a staff quarter and increase manpower for the home

 

Day 3

Andrew Child Development Centre (Leader: Pastor Lian Thang)

Treated 31 patients

Donated:

  • 70 goodie bags filled with stationeries
  • Subsidized 2 eye check-ups
  • Subsidized 2 dental treatments
  • 1 x-ray

Prayer requests:

  • More nurse aides to support this development center as current nurse aide is on maternity leave

 

Day 4

Bethesda Home (Leader: Pastor Henry)

Treated 21 patients

Donated:

  • 20 school bags
  • 20 pairs of slippers
  • 20 pencil cases filled with stationeries
  • Preloved clothes
  • Toothbrushes
  • Milo, Oat drink and snacks

Prayer requests:

  • Build a wooden house for the boys before rainy season starts in June as they currently sleep in a bamboo house
  • Reading lamps for the children
  • Uniforms and notebooks for the children when they start school in May
  • More funding to run the orphanage as surviving on USD320 a month (USD200 from a Malaysia charity, and USD120 from Pastor’s wife drawn salary as a government teacher)
  • To share the gospel with more people in the village

Reported By Ms. Sara Sim

2014
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CRS Mae Sot: Crossing Rivers, Breaking Boundaries

“We are all called to a mission, and the mission is our life.”-Dr. Lim Koon Jin

On 23 July 2014, a team of 11, comprising two doctors, three nurses, two aspiring doctors, and four other faithful servants of Christ, set out on a 6-day medical mission trip to Mae Sot, situated in West Thailand. Mae Sot is a trade hub which shares a border with Myanmar, and is home to many Burmese refugees seeking shelter from the civil war. We collaborated with a 9-man team from Bread & Life International, Pastor Ricki and family, Steadfast Love Church, and Mae La Refugee Camp Bible School, to organise medical clinics and children’s programmes for the Karen people of Mae Sot.

For 4 days, we saved lives, nurturedchildren, endured rickety truck rides and traversed treacherous terrains. Through wind, rain or shine, we worked ceaselessly, and poured out our hearts to serve the people to the best of our abilities. Every morning, we opened the day with worship and devotion, quieting our hearts before God and committing our day’s work to Him. After that, we headed to the Mae La refugee camp, running a children’s programme concurrently with the medical clinic. Everyone took turns helping out at the different stations – the triage, pharmacy, and children’s programme. Having refreshed ourselves with lunch at the camp, we went on to another refugee village for our afternoon clinic. At night, we had more varied activities, from children’s worship, night clinic, reflections, to R&R. On our last day in Mae Sot, we were blessed by the morning service held at the Steadfast Love Church in Ban Mai Village, led by youth worship leaders on fire for God.

“God taught me that He is in control no matter what happens and His ways are always higher than ours,” said June. These words rang loud and true, as the Lord blessed our team with many divine appointments during the trip, showing us that even with hiccups and delays, everything has a purpose in His time. On the third day, we set off for our first morning clinic at Mae La Refugee Camp. However, the government permit allowing us to enter the camp was missing from the entry checkpoint, causing a 4-hour delay. Nevertheless, we discovered that God had a divine reason for this long delay. As team members became hot, tired and frustrated, Pastor Ricki took the opportunity to conduct a bible study, which led Eric, a member of the Bread & Life International team, to accept Christ into his heart. What joy there must have been in heaven over the saving of one more soul! Furthermore, God blessed us with symbolic encounters, as Pastor Moses led us across tworivers, and the team was able to witness and lay hands on a woman stricken with leprosy. Just as Jesus miraculously healed the blind, the crippled, and the lepers in the bible, we continue to pray that Jehovah Rapha will heal and redeem every patient we encountered in Mae Sot.

God has blessed us richly in Singapore, so we can be a blessing to others. As Dr. Jennifer reflected, “Once again, I was remindedof blessings of our own home with four walls and a roof that doesn’t leak when it rains, plumbing that brings clean running water at the turn of a tap, education for myself and my daughters, safety for the children and good, affordable medical care.” It is our hope that through our clinics, activities and prayers, the people of Mae Sot felt the love that Christ first showed us when He died on the cross for our sins.

&With what we had, with our skills and talents, and with the overflowing of the spirit, we did what we could to serve the people ofMae Sot, and God multiplied our efforts a hundredfold,& concluded Samuel, team photographer and logistics I/C. Indeed, having touched more than 400 lives over 6 clinics, our team returned tired, but inspired. Having the opportunity to go on this mission trip together was a divine appointment in itself, and we all look forward with anticipation to the next CRS trip!

Reported by Ms. Victoria Chan

 

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Jakarta 24-28 May 2014

 

From the 24th to the 28th of May 2014, a team from CRS Singapore headed down to Jakarta for a cold trip (i.e. not a crisis relief trip). The team for this trip was larger than usual, comprising 12 people from different backgrounds: 1 doctor, 3 nurses, 6 medical students, and 2 bioengineering students. It was an interesting mix of working adults and students, which offered a unique variety of personalities and skills, and we learnt from one another as we worked together.

Everyday, we would get up at about 6.30am and have a time of worship and devotions. After breakfast, we would head out for the day’s activities. On Day 1, we attended services at the 2 churches we were partnering with- Karmel and Gideon Church, and for Days 2 and 3, we set up mobile clinics at these churches from morning to mid-afternoon. We were assigned to different stations: triage, laboratory tests, consultation, and pharmacy. It was a great experience being a part of something bigger, each of us contributing little efforts to make the clinic a success. There were opportunities to pray for the patients too, and some of us prayed for patients who were not believers. On the third day, we also visited the slum area to pray for some families and present our gifts of food packages. In the evening, we would have time to interact with the locals over a meal, or have some RnR to ourselves.

Our visit to the slum ministry was one that really touched our hearts. It was an unfamiliar experience, weaving our way through the labyrinth of houses and catching glimpses of the lives of its inhabitants. They lived in cramped conditions with often less than ideal conditions, yet they were all very hospitable and happy to see us. We met a few families and prayed for particular members of the household. One was an old lady who had recently lost her son, and as Ivy prayed for her, she was greatly overcome with emotion and filled with thankfulness. Wordlessly, she hugged each of us before we left. It was a clear demonstration of God’s power and comfort that transcend all boundaries, even language. There was another woman hoping to conceive children, and Dr KJ prayed over her and proclaimed that she would have not one but three children. This was a very inspiring moment to many of us, seeing the absolute faith that he had and claimed on so strongly.

Not one of us left Jakarta unchanged. Ming Wei, our food and accomodation I/C commented: “Overall, this trip was a meaningful one. The mobile clinic gave me an enjoyable experience in helping the patients. The volunteers from both Gideon and Karmel churches were friendly and helpful, and this allowed the team to communicate effectively, making it easier for us to do our work. In addition, the visit to the slums was an eye-opener for me as it made me appreciate the privileges I have in Singapore- access to clean water, food and medicine. If given the time and opportunity, I’ll definitely come back and render my assistance again.” Yi Hui, our children¡¯s ministry I/C added on: “It was a great experience to work alongside people who were willing to serve- both local partners and fellow Singaporeans. Sometimes things were a little impromptu but thank God for His grace to help us adapt to go along with the flow!”

Overall, we were unanimously touched by the warmth and sincerity of the locals as they hosted us, and were moved to do the same for them should they come to Singapore. We were also inspired by their dedication in service, just watching them worship and serve alongside us at the clinics, many having taken time off work to help out. We learnt how love is a language that others will inevitably feel even though we might not speak the same language. “Kindness is a language deaf people can hear and blind people can see,” said Gek Swee, our photographer. While it was a commendable effort for us, having served more than 600 patients over 2 days, it wasn’t the numbers that mattered the most, rather each and every individual life that we touched, be it through medical care, a prayer, or even just a simple smile and pat on the shoulder. The team hopes to return in the future to keep learning from these people and serving them.

Reported by Ms. Tessa Lim

2013
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Myanmar Sittwe Relief

 

Sittwe located at the Rakhine State has a population of 181,000. The team from Crisis Relief Singapore went down to Sittwe, Myanmar from 30th Nov 2013 to 5th December 2013 on medical relief.

There were 4 days of medical clinic. 2 full days and half day of mobile clinic and a Christmas outreach after that. Some of the patients come from different villages in the Rakhine state, some from the village itself. During the 3 days in Sittwe, we could see how the medical care was lacking and more backward there than in Yangon. Half a day of mobile clinic at Shwe Pyi Thar, Yangon. Many patients both in Sittwe and Yangon had cases of stress related ailments and high blood pressure. In total we saw 270 patients.

For the 3 days at Sittwe, we run a children¡¯s program. Most of the children could sing Children¡¯s songs and know about Jesus. Most of the children were from the boarding school program that Pastor Peter and Joshua were running.

On the day 3, we met a child patient with an abnormally large head, Ma Tha Zin Wai. She came with her parents from a faraway village as she had a fall recently. Our team was very interested in helping her to find a cause and treatment from her abnormality. We discussed for some time and decided to use our team fund to fly her over to Yangon with us to seek treatment at Yangon Hospital. Pastor Thein also found a german couple, doctors who were willing to pay for extra costs.

Terence(Team Leader) Took me back to a time and place gone by. A blast from the past where life was slow and time stood still. Walking down the road and streets less travelled. Mesmerized by the haunting smiles from faces, weather beaten by the harsh surroundings of life into their lives we bring glimmers of hope. That only the Lord can fill. Opening doors through His Love

Being the first ever medical trip to Sittwe, there is a lot more that can be done for the people there. The medical advancement in that area is quite slow so it will be difficult people who need long term medication and treatment there. Doctor Diong mentioned also that the people there might also be suffering from stress related problems, like anxiety, depression. It might be good to bring a psychiarist next time. Most people there do not wear spectacles as it would spoil their image. Causing some of them to endure headaches for a long time, an optometrist would be helpful too.

The team new to each other bonded very well together, we learned to work well with each other. The team¡¯s aim was to share God¡¯s love and show the people how much God loves them and I think we had achieved that we sincerely pray for opened doors to God¡¯s love.

2012
2011
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Report & Reflections of Crisis Relief Trip to Sri Lanka 27 April to 2 May 2011

 

By Pamelor Phor
Vanakam! (Hello in Tamil)

Upon our arrival in Colombo’s airport, we were welcomed warmly by the local church pastor, where we took a bumpy 10 hour bus ride to a town in the north of Sri Lanka called Vavinuya. Our bus battery exploded along the way but thank God by some miracle we managed to reach our destination without pushing the bus. Our first meal was sumptuous which was cooked by our local host, with the traditional nasi briyani, fried fish, daal, pappadum, etc. Some of us even tried to eat Indian style – with our bare hands! The “hotel” we stayed in was simple, with our fellow resident friends consisting of moths, mosquitoes, flies, cockroaches, bedbugs and even a frog in our bathroom. Heh. Nevertheless, God granted us the grace to have a good rest each night, as all of us were exhausted after a long day of work at the clinics.

We conducted 5 mobile clinic sessions in various places in the village, each session lasting about 3-4 hours at one go. Our one and only doctor saw about 500 patients in total. The rest of us helped out with other tasks such as registration, crowd control, playing with the children, packing and dispensing medicine and praying for the sick. We encountered common illnesses such as flu, worms in stomach, aches and pain the body, while some had more serious diseases such as cataract, deformed bodies, embedded bullet, tumours, etc. We prayed for every person who came, for the Lord to heal them – physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually. 8 people received salvation and 1 received immediate healing – Praise Him!

We were supposed to enter an internally displaced people (IDP) camp which housed the Tamils during the civil war which ended in 2009. However, due to the volatile political situation, despite getting the legal permit, we were stopped at the border and had to turn back. It was disappointing for some of us, but we trusted that God was in control and had his purposes. I had heard stories from trippers who managed to get into the IDP camps in previous trips, and hope to come back someday to minister to the people in there.

We also visited 2 local church services while we were there – it was interesting to see how the locals worshipped God in their own way. I’m always amazed how people from different cultures, languages, backgrounds, can worship God together in one spirit. Some of us shared our testimonies. Most of the church goers were women and children – as in most developing countries. One church we visited was smaller than my bedroom! And it fitted about 30 people in total. It was so suffocating that my team leader (the doctor) nearly fainted while preaching his message. It was humbling to see how sincere they were in worshipping God despite their poverty and circumstance. It was also amazing seeing both the Christian Sinhalese and Tamils serving the Lord together, considering that they were both enemies in the civil war.

We had about a day and a half to rest and relax in Colombo – which we spent at one of the local pastor’s church house, and driving down south to a famous beach town called Gaal – but it was dark and raining when we reached there =/ Nevertheless, it was a good time with one another’s company. I’m really thankful for getting to go on this trip with this great bunch of people, whom I only met a few weeks before the trip. Yet it was amazing how we all got along and worked together like we’ve known one another for years! Most of the trippers were younger than me surprisingly – the average age was 28 years old which included two 50+ yrs old ple, so the median age would be around 23 years. The youngest girl was 18 years old, but she amazed me the most with her enthusiasm and humility serving the Lord – I wish the youth in church were all like her.

Each mission trip I go for affirms my calling by the Lord, though I’m not exactly sure where He wants me to go or what He wants me to do, but I believe that as I trust Him each step of the way, He would show and lead me one step at a time =)

I would be raising funds for Crisis Relief Singapore by running my 1st marathon (Adidas Sundown) on 28th May 2011. My target is to complete 42km within 6 hours. You can support me in this effort by contributing any amount. All contributions would go entirely to Crisis Relief Singapore – which is a non-profit organization. You can find out more about them on their website: http://www.crisisrelief.org/ Your contributions would give me greater reason and motivation to finish this marathon!

I’m not a natural runner (in fact, I used to tell people that I hate running), but with much discipline and hard work, I’ve learnt the art of running. At the same time, I learn to enjoy the process of running… Trust me, it’s not easy. Sometimes I feel like giving up. But what keeps me going is the thought/ sight of the end point (rest at last!) Each time I run, I’m reminded of how life is like a race (or rather, a marathon). Some people say that life is a rat race. You can run, just for the sake of running, or for a personal sense of accomplishment, or for health reasons. For myself, I strive to run this race of life with purpose, and to end it well! I pray that you would do so too and I will see you at the finishing line =)

“Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us, fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. Consider him who endured such opposition from sinners, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart.”

Yesu Ungalai Neissi Kira! (Jesus loves you)

2010
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Pakistan Flood Relief (2010)

Following heavy monsoon rains in June 2010, the nation of Pakistan experienced one of the worst disasters faced by a nation in this decade. Severe flooding caused deaths to almost 2,000 people and affected the lives of about 20 million people. At one point, about 1/5 of the nation’s land mass was underwater. In response to urgent requests from Full Gospel Assembly Pakistan and a world-wide relief effort movement, CRS sent a recce team in September to assess safe working zones for medical relief teams and establish partnerships in different regions of Pakistan.

Team 1, 23rd – 30th Oct, comprising of Aaron Chiong, Chin Wan Teng, Christine Cheah, Desiree Phua, Johnny Tang and Dr. Derek Allen (TroppoDoc) was sent for the purpose of ministering medical needs to victims in the region of Karachi and RahimYar Khan.

Team 2, 2nd – 8th November 2010, comprising of Estella Ng, Eileen Goh, Premchand Deepchand, Yeo Li Xin, Dr. Jason Lau and Dr. Derek Allen dispensed much needed medical aid to more than 400 patients in the districts of Nausharo Feroze, Kandiaro, Mithani and Moro.

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Haiti Earthquake Relief

An earthquake of Ricther scale 7.0 hit Haiti on 12th January 2010. Catastrophic damage was reported and death tolls stood at 150,000. Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, Leogane and Jacmel have seen severe damage and general infrastructure had collapsed in regions close to the earthquake’s epicenter.

Haiti is the poorest country in the Western hemisphere and the severity of this disaster left the country unable to help itself. In response, Crisis Relief Singapore, in collaboration with City Care sent out 6 teams of medical personnel and workers operating back to back in the aftermath.

The teams operated a mobile clinic located in a church compound, seeing sometimes up to 300 patients a day with no respite. Amongst others, they worked alongside other international organizations like United Nations, United States Navy, US Firefighters for Christ, German Red Cross and many others.

CRS’s Involvement
  • Team 2 (20th Jan – 30th Jan 2010): Dr Jennifer Yeo
  • Team 4 (29th Jan – 8th Feb 2010) : Dr Ian Mathews
  • Team 5 (17th Feb – 27th Feb 2010): Dr Jennifer Yeo, Dr Derek Allen, Terence Lim, Sharon Tan, Lim Kwee Lee
  • Team 6 (27th Feb – 7th Mar 2010):
    Dr Lim Koon Jin, Derrick Ong, Lim Huishan

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Myanmar Cyclone Relief

On 2nd May 2008, Cyclone Nargis hit the nation of Myanmar. It is the worst natural disaster in the history of Myanmar, with at least 146,000 fatalities and 1.5 million people severely affected by the cyclone.

As a response, CRS sent a recee team during 7th to 11th June 2008 to examine the disaster situation after some delay in applying for visas. After much evaluation and prayer, CRS decided to work with the local orphanages in Yangon first and recruited volunteers to provide medical aid and conduct children programs there.

After the access into the Irrawaddy Delta was approved, relief teams ventured into Bogale, one of the worst hit area in the Irrawaddy Delta division. Into total, CRS sent 5 relief teams to Myanmar in 2008 & 2009.

As part of its follow-up work, CRS has
sent a team in 2009 and 2010
respectively to continue its ongoing
project with the local orphanages.
We will prayerfully consider the
possibility of future trips.

2009
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Padang Earthquake Relief

 

In September 2009, an earthquake of magnitude 7.6 struck off Indonesia’s Sumatra Island at 1716hrs. Several aftershocks continued intermittently through the day and up to 75% of buildings in West Sumatra’s regional centre, Padang were destroyed. Total deaths and injuries stood in the thousands and an estimated 250,000 families were affected by the earthquake due to partial or total loss of their homes and livelihoods.

In response, CRS in collaboration with City Care Limited and Missions Teams International formed up 3 teams consisting of medical personnel and volunteers to minister in the region of Pariaman by running mobile clinics and performing food distribution.

The need for medical attention was great as Team 1 attended to 1,149 patients in the span of 4 days. In the aftermath of the earthquake, Team 2 experienced significant tremors but nonetheless returned safely back to Singapore. In addition to performing medical procedures and with the kind sponsorship of Bethesda Frankel Estate Church, Team 3 was able to distribute over 240kg of Halal food ration packets to the villagers.

 

Team 1: 13-17 Oct

Lim Meng Jin City Care
Loo Wai Yang, Desmond City Care
Lu Jirong City Care
Janet Anastasia Yap Lay Yoke MTI
Yip Yan Yee CRS
Tan Ming Nguan Aloysius CRS
Ling Xi Wern CRS
Long Shiwei Kenneth CRS
Ian Mathews CRS

 

Team 2: 17-22 Oct

Yeo Siew Lin Jennifer CRS
Lim Kwee Lee CRS
Tan Meng Guek CRS
Goh Yen Tien Eileen CRS
Tan Keok Ee CRS
Lim Poo Huat CRS

 

Team 3: 22-27 Oct

Lim Hui Shan CRS
Tan Yee Cher CRS
Lim Ann Soo Florence CRS
Krystal Khoo Oon Hui CRS
Keziah Khoo Oon-Ching CRS
Derrick Ong CRS


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Sri Lanka Civil War Relief

The nation of Sri Lanka is an island in the middle of the Indian Ocean. In 2004, it was hit by the Tsunami which resulted in over 35,000 deaths and CRS sent many relief teams to help in the relief effort.

However, Sri Lanka has also been facing civil war since 1983 between the Sri Lankan government and Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE). In early 2009, the Sri Lankan government launched large scale attacks to take control of the whole nation that resulted in more than 6,500 deaths and many more thousands injured.
As a response, CRS sent relief teams in June to September 2009 to help to conduct mobile medical clinic and food distribution at the Internally Displaced People camps and the surrounding areas in Batticaloa and Vanni.


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Bangladesh Flood Relief

Bangladesh is a country in the Indian subcontinent that is criss-crossed by a network of 230 rivers, most of them tributaries of the Ganges and Brahmaputra. As a result of snow-melting of the Himalayan glaciers and monsoon rain, the country suffers annual floods with at least a fifth of the country submerged each year.

In 2008, different parts of low-lying Bangladesh have been flooded and up to 600,000 has been stranded by the flood. To help in the disaster relief, CRS sent 2 relief teams in November and December 2008 to Koligram to provide medical aid and conduct children program in the disaster areas.

2008
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Bangladesh Flood Relief

Bangladesh is a country in the Indian subcontinent that is criss-crossed by a network of 230 rivers, most of them tributaries of the Ganges and Brahmaputra. As a result of snow-melting of the Himalayan glaciers and monsoon rain, the country suffers annual floods with at least a fifth of the country submerged each year.

In 2008, different parts of low-lying Bangladesh have been flooded and up to 600,000 has been stranded by the flood. To help in the disaster relief, CRS sent 2 relief teams in November and December 2008 to Koligram to provide medical aid and conduct children program in the disaster areas.

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Myanmar Cyclone Relief

On 2nd May 2008, Cyclone Nargis hit the nation of Myanmar. It is the worst natural disaster in the history of Myanmar, with at least 146,000 fatalities and 1.5 million people severely affected by the cyclone.

As a response, CRS sent a recee team during 7th to 11th June 2008 to examine the disaster situation after some delay in applying for visas. After much evaluation and prayer, CRS decided to work with the local orphanages in Yangon first and recruited volunteers to provide medical aid and conduct children programs there.

After the access into the Irrawaddy Delta was approved, relief teams ventured into Bogale, one of the worst hit area in the Irrawaddy Delta division. Into total, CRS sent 5 relief teams to Myanmar in 2008 & 2009.

As part of its follow-up work, CRS has
sent a team in 2009 and 2010
respectively to continue its ongoing
project with the local orphanages.
We will prayerfully consider the
possibility of future trips.

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Aceh Tsunami Rebuilding Projects

The Aceh Tsunami Rebuilding Projects are a series of different projects to provide for the needs of Aceh residents after Tsunami in December 2004.

The first project involved the replacement of 300 fishing boats for the fishermen from the Pulau Banyak Islands and Singkil after the tsunami so they might continue their livelihood.

The second project included the provision an ice making machine and 2 logistic boats for the fisherman to consolidate their catch for transport elsewhere for sale.

In the third project, our volunteers to set up mobile clinic and provided teachers’ training in Nias.

The last project involved reconstruction of the only secondary school
in the Pulau Banyak Islands badly damaged by the tsunami.

Most of these projects were co-funded by the
Tidal Wave Asia Fund from the Singapore
Red Cross Society.

2007
2006
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LoveJAVA Project

 

A 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck Central Java in the early morning on
27 May 2006. It is estimated that about 5700 people were killed and
50 000 people injured. Many homes were destroyed and people made homeless.

A survey team was sent to the devastation from 1 to 4 June 2006. They felt that the situation was under control due to the good organization of the Indonesian Government and large number of NGO’s that had responded to this crisis.

After visiting Yogyakarta and the surrounding towns, it was perceived that CRS would best assist our local partners by sending small mobile medical teams into the remoter villages and participates in food distribution.

Five teams of doctors, nurses and volunteers participated in medical clinics and food distribution from 1-30 June 2006.

Recce Team (1st to 4th June 2006) Members: Dr Lim Koon Jin, Jason Heng, Estella Ng, Kua Young Ghee The Recce Team sought out local partners to work with. They went into a village at Klaten and ran mobile clinic there with the approval of the local mosque.

Team 1 (4th to 11th June 2006)
Members: Jason Heng, Ling Sing Nang, Tan Ek Khoon
The team partnered with another organization and ran medical clinic at various villages. The number of patients vary from about 60 to 150 on different days. The team was well received by the villagers, and new opportunities are opening up for networking.

Team 2 (11th to 18th June 2006)
Members: Soh Choi Ling, Dr. Yeoh Peng Cheng, George Annadorai, Joanna Tan & Winston Chin
Together with local partners, the team set up medical clinic in several remote villages in the Bantul region. They saw about 240 patients over 4 days. Most of the patients were experiencing post-traumatic stress syndrome.

Team 3 (21st to 25th June 2006)
Members: Lim Koon Jin, Victor Ong, June Lim, Dino Tan, Fawn Lim, Henry Lee, Agnes Lee, Alan Tan, Jenny

Team 4 (25th to 30th June 2006)
Members: Mok Choon Hoe, Anthony Chao, Mona Khoo, Susana Ling, Alex Chew, Derick Choo, Ng Tze Chong, Terence Lim

Continuing from the foundation of trust achieved by the earlier CRS teams, these two teams were able to provide much needed medical, social and spiritual support for the relief and rehabilitation of the people of across affected regions of Bantul, Sleman and Klaten.

We would like to thank all our volunteers and numerous generous donations. CRS was able to offer free medical services and follow-up care to a daily average of 70 patients for the whole month of June. The complemented the good work, by our partners, already in progress amongst 11 communities in the affected areas.

Describing the strong bonds forged between CRS and our new friends in Indonesia, Ibu Sigit, a worker of GIDI, wrote in a letter of appreciation: “We express much gratitude for the support, morally and materially. With full patience and friendliness, you have helped us. Do not forget us, for we too will always remember all of you.”

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Pakistan Earthquake Relief Project 2005-2006

 

“Heaven on earth” as Bagh was once called, was the second hardest hit region in Pakistan (after Muzaffarabad) of the 2005 Kashmir Earthquake. Receiving lesser attention from international NGOs, many of the villages living in the hilly countries beyond Bagh town received organized relief aid much later. It was thus a concern for the victims of the earthquake on 8th October may not survive as winter approached during the third week of November.

CRS has teamed up with a local partner to provide relief to Bagh.With its base located in a Pakistani army camp 20km away from Bagh town, it sent mobile medical teams and relief supplies into the villages in the mountains. Report from CRS first medical team led by Dr. Derek Allen showed that as of 22 October, more than 50% of the villagers still required medical help–about half of these were children. They suffered from respiratory illnesses, exposure, infected wounds and fractures. In each village, the team saw 100-150 patients a day. Some of the patients would not have survived if they were not picked up by the medical team, given appropriate treatments and evacuated.

CRS has also raised funds to purchase and deliver blankets/tents and medical supplies into the villages. It has helped them to survive the winter, as access roads may be closed and the villages inaccessible during winter.

2005
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Pakistan Earthquake Relief Project 2005-2006

“Heaven on earth” as Bagh was once called, was the second hardest hit region in Pakistan (after Muzaffarabad) of the 2005 Kashmir Earthquake. Receiving lesser attention from international NGOs, many of the villages living in the hilly countries beyond Bagh town received organized relief aid much later. It was thus a concern for the victims of the earthquake on 8th October may not survive as winter approached during the third week of November.

CRS has teamed up with a local partner to provide relief to Bagh. With its base located in a Pakistani army camp 20km away from Bagh town, it sent mobile medical teams and relief supplies into the villages in the mountains. Report from CRS first medical team led by Dr. Derek Allen showed that as of 22 October, more than 50% of the villagers still required medical help–about half of these were children. They suffered from respiratory illnesses, exposure, infected wounds and fractures. In each village, the team saw 100-150 patients a day. Some of the patients would not have survived if they were not picked up by the medical team, given appropriate treatments and evacuated.

CRS has also raised funds to purchase and deliver blankets/tents and medical supplies into the villages. It has helped them to survive the winter, as access roads may be closed and the villages inaccessible during winter.


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Maldives Tsunami Relief Project

The December 2004 Asian Tsunami that struck coastal areas on both sides of the Indian Ocean was probably one of the largest global disasters the world has ever witnessed. An estimate of 230,000 persons were killed in this disaster, and state of emergency were declared in Maldives, Sri Lanka and Indonesia.
In the aftermath of the disaster, CRS provided relief to the tsunami victims in the Maldives and Sri Lanka. For Maldives, CRS purchase and packed about 1000 kitchenware packages in Singapore and shipped them to over 30 Maldivian islands. The package included gas cooking stoves, utensils and cooking ware.

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Sri Lanka Tsunami Relief

The December 2004 Asian Tsunami that struck coastal areas on both sides of the Indian Ocean was probably one of the largest global disasters the world has ever witnessed. An estimated 230,000 persons were killed in this disaster, and state of emergencies were declared in Maldives, Sri Lanka and Indonesia.

In the aftermath of the disaster, CRS provided relief to the tsunami victims in the Maldives and Sri Lanka. CRS provided food for over 1,750 families in the district of Batticaloa over a 12 week period. Nine teams went to Sri Lanka on a weekly basis to assist local volunteers with packing and distribution of the food packages. Some of the teams ran medical clinics, visited the affected households and ran children programs too.

In Galle, CRS partnered a local NGO to launch a program called “Our Children”. Five teams were sent there to help facilitate after-school care and children’s programs.


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Iran Earthquake Relief

On 26 December 2003, an earthquake measuring 6.5 on the Richter scale hit the ancient city of Bam in the southwest of Iran. About 40 000 inhabitants lost their lives and 85%of the buildings were destroyed. In its wake, families were destroyed and many children orphaned.

CRS was privileged to be given the opportunity by the Iranian government to participate in food distribution to BAFIA camp which is home to 2000 surviving inhabitants.

We participated in 4 months of food distribution, sending 7 teams to Bam. Through our interaction with the community and sharing in their grief, our volunteers were touched and inspired to see such resourcefulness and courage in the midst of such devastation.

2004
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Aceh Tsunami Rebuilding Projects

The Aceh Tsunami Rebuilding Projects are a series of different projects to provide for the needs of Aceh residents after Tsunami in December 2004.

The first project involved the replacement of 300 fishing boats for the fishermen from the Pulau Banyak Islands and Singkil after the tsunami so they might continue their livelihood.

The second project included the provision an ice making machine and 2 logistic boats for the fisherman to consolidate their catch for transport elsewhere for sale.

In the third project, our volunteers to set up mobile clinic and provided teachers’ training in Nias.

The last project involved reconstruction of the only secondary school
in the Pulau Banyak Islands badly damaged by the tsunami.

Most of these projects were co-funded by the
Tidal Wave Asia Fund from the Singapore
Red Cross Society.

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Iran Earthquake Relief

On 26 December 2003, an earthquake measuring 6.5 on the Richter scale hit the ancient city of Bam in the southwest of Iran. About 40 000 inhabitants lost their lives and 85%of the buildings were destroyed. In its wake, families were destroyed and many children orphaned.

CRS was privileged to be given the opportunity by the Iranian government to participate in food distribution to BAFIA camp which is home to 2000 surviving inhabitants.

We participated in 4 months of food distribution, sending 7 teams to Bam. Through our interaction with the community and sharing in their grief, our volunteers were touched and inspired to see such resourcefulness and courage in the midst of such devastation.

2003
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Mongolia Winter Relief

Mongolia is a harsh land situated in the high regions of Central Asia. Severe climatic conditions like summer draughts and dzuds (harsh winters) wreak havoc regularly, making it difficult for normadic herdsmen to maintain their livestock of yaks. These poor animals perish as a result of the harsh conditions, depriving the herdsmen of food, transportation, heat and money. Approximately six hundred thousand herdsmen in seventeen of Mongolia’s 21 provinces were affected, many of them making long futile journeys in search of grazing pasture, leaving them physically and mentally exhausted.

Mrs Lim Bee Yong and Mrs Pauline Tan, both volunteers of CRS, helped to coordinate this project with ACROSS (Anglican Crisis Relief Operations and Strategic Services). They distributed about fifteen tones of rice and flour to approximately 600 families (2000 people) near Ulaanbator from 21-25 February 2003.

2002
2001
2000
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Timor-Leste Civil Disturbance Relief in Dili

In April 2006, riots broke out in Dili, capital of East Timor following rivalry and discrimination within the military and expanded to general violence throughout the country.

40 people were killed during fighting between pro-government troops and disaffected Falintil troops. As the situation esculated into a crisis, several countries intervened by sending military peace-keeping troops.

The situation resulted in 27 refugee camps in Dili, 67,000 internally displaced persons, of which 30,000 were aged 15 and under. There was a great need of medical attention and
nutrition to be delivered.

In collaboration with LOVE SINGAPORE, CRS sent a team of doctors and nurses to conduct medical mobile clinics and milk powder distribution to the refugee camps and internally
displaced people.

1999

Our History